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Thread: Woodworking, favorite woods.

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    Serial Murcerer ZokesPro's Avatar
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    Default Woodworking, favorite woods.

    Hey Dr Mordrid, so I read that your a wood worker. Was curious as to your favorite woods to work with? (not just Dr but anyone else too)

    So my top favorite woods are Gaboon Ebony and Purpleheart. I like the Ebony way more though, smells awful when sanding. The color is just magnificent when oiled and it almost feels like living metal of the sorts. Really feels like a beastly kind of wood. Purpleheart, well I love the color and it's quite dense as well, smells good when sanding or cutting. A pain to work with, but forces me to use different techniques.

    Bocote is really nice too, the grain is fabulous, pixalates when it breaks, which is kinda odd . One I recently discovered is Padauk, smells really good when cutting or sanding.
    Last edited by ZokesPro; 21st May 2020 at 21:36.
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    Moderator Dr Mordrid's Avatar
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    I like white & red oak, maple, birdseye maple, ironwood (American hornbeam), poplar, aspen, southern pine, birch, teak. Purpleheart, redwood & ebony for trim/inlays and the dark parts of intarsia.

    Using oak, ironwood and other tough woods means carbide cutters everywhere,
    Last edited by Dr Mordrid; 7th April 2020 at 06:30.
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    Serial Murcerer ZokesPro's Avatar
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    I was searching for some exotic woods and came across Spectra Ply. Ever work with that kind of stuff?
    Last edited by ZokesPro; 14th May 2020 at 05:49.
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    Moderator Dr Mordrid's Avatar
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    Nope. I generally turn solid pieces and roll my own stains. If a larger painted piece then I'll glue it up from stock then turn, sand, prime and have the paint mixed at our area workmans playground, Northside.

    Northside is an old-old-school general hardware store where if they don't have it, you don't need it. Everything from cookware and auto parts to custom threaded pipes, sheet metal, and cut glass & acrylics. Tools, paints & finishes....

    It's like a trip to Hooterville.
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    Serial Murcerer ZokesPro's Avatar
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    I was kinda hoping to you'd had tried some (or something similar) to know what it's like to work with, if it's strong and such.
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    Moderator Dr Mordrid's Avatar
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    I'm too much of a paint/stain color control freak to use dyed stuff.
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    Serial Murcerer ZokesPro's Avatar
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    Well, I discovered that type of wood just a few days ago but there's no info on it. B'ah I won't buy any anyways, there are a bunch of species I haven't tried yet so it's no matter.

    I myself prefer to just oil the wood and let the natural colors come through, but then again, everything I make is hand held so staining or painting isn't ideal, but if I was making furniture, that would be a different story.

    I'd love to try rosewood btw, looks beautiful, from what google can show me.
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    Moderator Dr Mordrid's Avatar
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    Rosewood is great for "boutique" items like jewellery cases, display boxes, frames, brush & mirror handles etc. Also high end furniture. Wife loves 'em as gifts

    I like natural finishes a lot, most of our house is trimmed that way. Built our fireplace mantle from a 3"x16"x16' piece of oak. 6 big corbels to hold it up & hang Xmas stockings.
    Last edited by Dr Mordrid; 12th April 2020 at 23:52.
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    Super MURCer Greebe's Avatar
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    We had Rosewood trees where I lived in Ohio. Trees don't get very big, break easy in the wind. Beautiful species, if only large trees existed in some windless land
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    Serial Murcerer ZokesPro's Avatar
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    Y'all mention this magical, mystical Rosewood. Is it any good for a bo?
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    Moderator Dr Mordrid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZokesPro View Post
    Y'all mention this magical, mystical Rosewood. Is it any good for a bo?
    No, rosewood is more a luxury goods or fancy trim wood than for a tool handle or weapon.

    Hickory or ash are affordable & tough, with ash being used for baseball bats. Hickory is often laminated for making bo staves, and can be bought from martial arts suppliers.

    Also dense samples of white oak or one of the ironwoods can take and give a beating, but both are heavy - especially the ironwoods. Ironwoods are also $$. In the US, lignum vitae.

    What makes ironwoods so tough? Cellulose density, the amount of lignum, and many concentrate silica into their matrix. Some give off sparks when cut by a carbide blade. One species is even used in submarine bearings.

    Hitting someone over the noggin with ironwood isn't much different than using a black iron pipe. .
    Last edited by Dr Mordrid; 23rd April 2020 at 14:39.
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    Serial Murcerer ZokesPro's Avatar
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    Well, ever since you mentioned hickory, I've been scouring the hardware stores for this wood. I found stair nose moulding, but the dimensions for a bo aren't great. But hickory does have the best modulous of rupture which seems ideal for a bo.

    I'm going to keep searching.
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    Super MURCer Greebe's Avatar
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    Good ol Shaggy Bark Hickory trees. Twas a small housing development outside of Troy Ohio back in 'the mid '70's my father worked with the developer on by the same name, Shaggy Bark. There was a grove of the trees this place was building up around and owner wanted as little of trees touched as possible to preserve the natural setting of the entire property. Yep Shaggy Bark is very, well shaggy
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    Serial Murcerer ZokesPro's Avatar
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    What would you make with black palm wood? Every time I work with that evil wood. That never happened before, but then again, the pieces I have are roughly half inner (lighter softer wood), and half outer (dark harder wood), but wavy which makes it hard to make anything decent.

    I was also thinking about that hickory wood ever since Dr mentioned that wood. I'm going to set aside that project until I can get my hand on a decent length piece offline. But that shagwood looks beautiful. Makes me think a lot of about scooby doo for some reason.
    Last edited by ZokesPro; 21st May 2020 at 21:37.
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    Serial Murcerer ZokesPro's Avatar
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    This is my last black palm wood failure. Who named this? It isn't even wood. It's just a bunch of sharp splinters tightly packed together. Sanding or no sanding? You can reduce the amount of splinters by sanding it down but the higher grit you go, the sharper the splinters get. What does one do with this stuff?
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