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Thread: Falcon 9: Crew Dragon DM-1 - uncrewed test flight to ISS (launch date)

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    Moderator Dr Mordrid's Avatar
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    Default Falcon 9: Crew Dragon DM-1 - uncrewed test flight to ISS (launch date)

    Here. We. Go.

    Space News...

    Crew Dragon completes thermal vacuum tests ahead of first test flight

    CINCINNATI — The first SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft has completed a series of tests at a NASA center that may put the spacecraft one step closer to an uncrewed test flight later this year.

    In a speech at the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics’ Propulsion and Energy Forum here July 9, Janet Kavandi, director of NASA’s Glenn Research Center, said the spacecraft recently left the center’s Plum Brook Station after a series of thermal vacuum and acoustics tests.

    “They just left yesterday or today,” she said in her remarks at the conference. “They’ve been out there twice, at least, at Plum Brook Station.” She didn’t disclose the outcome of the tests, and SpaceX did not respond to an email requesting comment on the status of the test.

    The company previously indicated that the testing at Plum Brook was the last milestone before the spacecraft was shipped to Florida for final testing and integration with its Falcon 9 rocket. “Once complete, Crew Dragon will travel to Kennedy Space Center in Florida ahead of its first flight,” the company said in a June 20 Instagram post about the tests that were ongoing at Plum Brook.

    Jessica Jensen, director of Dragon mission management at SpaceX, also said the Plum Brook tests were the last before the spacecraft is shipped to Florida for launch. “Once it leaves Plum Brook, it’s going to come down to Cape Canaveral for final launch processing,” she said at a June 28 briefing at the Kennedy Space Center about the launch of a Dragon cargo spacecraft to the International Space Station.
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    The test flight astronauts for Crew Dragon and Boeing's StarLiner. No flight assignments yet.



    Crew Dragon DM-1 vehicle

    Diameter: 3.7 m (12 ft) with Trunk
    Height: 8.1 m (27 ft) with Trunk
    Pressurized volume: 10 m3 (350 cu/ft)
    Unpressurized volume (Trunk): 14 m3 (490 cu/ft)



    Same DM-1 vehicle minus the nose cone, thermal panel bolt sealant and Trunk thermal radiator covers.



    Crew Dragon launch abort system test flight. 8 SuperDraco engines, arranged in redundant pairs with fratricide protection and multi-redundant plumbing. Full thrust in 100ms.

    SuperDraco thrust (each): 71,000 N (16,000 lbf)

    Last edited by Dr Mordrid; 9th July 2018 at 23:23.
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    Moderator Dr Mordrid's Avatar
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    @SpaceX
    The team at our rocket development facility in McGregor, Texas completed a static fire test last night of the Falcon 9 booster that will launch SpaceXs first demonstration mission for @NASAs Commercial Crew Program one step closer to flying astronauts to the @Space_Station!

    https://twitter.com/SpaceX/status/1055978878043181056

    @NASASpaceflight
    That's Falcon 9 Block 5 B1051.1. A normal flow would mean this could be processed for a December mission, based on the timeline of SF at McGregor-to-Launch. DM-1 is, however, also pending Dragon 2 preparation status and the recently noted "Paperwork" on the NASA side.

    https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/...80118194171907

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    Per NASASpaceFlight,

    Crew Dragon DM-1 is boarded for NET January 8th, 2019

    Also,

    The NASA Launch Services Program has qualified Falcon 9 for Category 3 launches; their highest value Class A and Class B payloads.

    Still working on the separate certification to launch nuclear powered payloads.
    Last edited by Dr Mordrid; 9th November 2018 at 16:19.
    Dr. Mordrid
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    I carry a gun because I can't throw a rock 1,250 fps

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    Michael Sheetz ✔ @thesheetztweetz
    @SpaceX Commercial Crew Demo-1 mission is now scheduled for no earlier than January 17, a source tells me.

    The delay is 10 days later than the Jan. 7 target which @NASA announced previously.
    |
    Michael Sheetz ✔ @thesheetztweetz
    Worth noting that NASA administrator @JimBridenstine said in November that Demo-1 was announced to give international press time to request access. “There are reviews in Dec to decide configuration, waivers and date.”https://twitter.com/jimbridenstine/s...929182721?s=21
    |
    Jim Bridenstine ✔ @JimBridenstine
    To be clear, the date announcement for Demo-1 was to enable intl press access. There are reviews in Dec to decide configuration, waivers and date. Intl partners, the range, and ISS availability could also impact schedule. http://SpaceNews.com https://shar.es/aasH6P
    7:30 PM - Dec 4, 2018
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    Now that SpaceX, NASA, and the range are all focusing on January 17th for the DM-1 test flight it's clear that SpaceX is ahead. Launch time should be about 20:02 Eastern.

    Boeing is making good progress on its Starliner capsule, but the service module has serious problems.

    Early on they got way ahead on paperwork milestones and pushed off hardware development, and that's now biting them in the ass.

    Basically, they depended too much on simulation when it came to the plumbing runs & valves for their abort engines, ending up with a water hammer effect during physical tests which is causing them to redesign the whole thing. Whatever dates are published for Starliner test flights, add a serious fudge factor.

    I wouldn't be surprised if they had to add an in-flight abort test to further retire risk.

    Astronauts training inside Crew Dragon


    GO Searcher Crew Dragon recovery ship, one of the growing SpaceX Armada.


    DM-1 vehicle


    Concept art showing the newly installed Crew Access Arm (left top)
    Last edited by Dr Mordrid; Yesterday at 07:01.
    Dr. Mordrid
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    An elephant is a mouse built to government specifications.

    I carry a gun because I can't throw a rock 1,250 fps

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