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Technoid
8th December 1999, 13:49
If my computer is colder than 20 celsius the memory fails and if ir gets to W98 it goes "Blue screen" with a mass of strange VXD errors!
If i let the system "heat" upp to above 20 Celsius the problem is gone!
And I always thought computers loved to "chill out"!
Any ideas?

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INTEL PIII450 MSI 6163
G200Mill 16MB SDRAM + RRG
SBlive
128 MB RAM
19GB HDD Space!

Joachim
9th December 1999, 02:34
This problem occured to me, too, but it wasn't the memory. The problems' origin was the hard disk. I just formatted it, when I got it and it was very hot in the computer case (about 38 degrees, sun directly shining on it). Whenever I did a "cold" boot (temperature in the case lower than abot 23 degrees) I got the same messages. I just reformatted the hard drive at a case temperature of about 20 degrees and never got this porblem occur again. Hope this will help you too!

Good luck.

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Technoid
9th December 1999, 13:44
It sounds plausible, but how does the HDD cause Memmory Failed errors?

Joachim
10th December 1999, 01:22
Well Technoid,

the HDD is just not able to read the .vxd file correctly, because of moisture on one or more of the magnetical disks a HDD consists of.

Green
10th December 1999, 07:39
Hard drive platters make a pretty cool coaster! http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/smile.gif

Green --

Chucky Cheese
10th December 1999, 09:06
Technoid,

this sounds like your hard drive is stuck in a "thermal re-calibration" loop. most HDDs have this feature as part of their electronics. if the hdd was re-calibrating during a request to read, bad things could happen.

chucky

Technoid
10th December 1999, 14:46
I s my drive(s) going to break?
If so i vill keep my room temperature more stabile!
Maybe let the temp rise before using the 'puter!

Chucky Cheese
10th December 1999, 22:01
Technoid,

all things being in good shape i'd say no. this condition can also be caused by a drive getting to hot. i have a lot of devices in my system(see below...) and my temp inside my case is around 70 degrees F(+/- 3) and all i use are case fans...alot of them to be sure(5+ps+2 cpu fans), and i leave it on 24 by 7, except when i take down for cleaning. if you want an eye opener look up the normal operating temp of a gallium arsenide transistor junction or silicon.

one other thing...i've worked on a lot of peoples systems that are stuffed full, leaving no room for air to circulate. there is a lot to be said for an over sized case.

chucky

Platform Configuration:

Motherboard: AMI MegaRUM II, dual 600Mhz Pentium III processors (installed), each with a 32/512 Cache configuration. 512 Mb of PC100, 8ns memory. Symbios Logic 53C896 U2W SCSI controllers. Intel 443GX Xeon chipset.

SCSI I/O:

Channel 1(LVD/U2): 4 Seagate LVD Cheetah 18LP, ST39103LW Ultra2 Wide SCSI-3 hard Drives, each with 1024k cache.

Channel 2(SE): JAZ 2GB internal, Plex-Writer 8/20, Pioneer DVD-303s ultra-scsi DVD reader and 2 UltraPlex-Wide 17/40 speed CD-ROM drives.

USB: USB Zip Drive, SideWinder Dual Strike 3D game controller

Networking: The network adapter is a 3Com 3C509B-TX PCI adapter and a US Robotics Courier V.Everything 33.6/28.8/x2/V.90 internal ISA modem.

Video: Matrox G400 Max with Dual Head. The primary display is a Panasonic PanaSync E21, .25-dot pitch, 20" viewable; the secondary display is a Viewsonic flat panel display model VP150.

Multi-media: Creative Labs Sound Blaster Live PCI Bus Mastering sound card. Speaker system are the Cambridge Works FPS2000 Digital speaker system.


[This message has been edited by Chucky Cheese (edited 11 December 1999).]

Technoid
11th December 1999, 01:59
Thanks for all Advices!
But i still don't understande what the HDD do to cause my RAM to fail the boot test!

------------------
INTEL PIII450 MSI 6163
G200Mill 16MB SDRAM + RRG
SBlive
128 MB RAM
19GB HDD Space!




[This message has been edited by Technoid (edited 11 December 1999).]

Vic
12th December 1999, 13:29
You didn't say it failed the boot test in your first post!

Remove the RAM module(s) and gently wipe the contacting surfaces with a soft pencil eraser. Refit & retry

I would say that your problems are most likely to be of a 'mechanical' nature, (contacts etc) as most electronic problems would be most likely to manifest themselves at higher temperatures (as most overclockers know!)

Vic

Alegria
14th December 1999, 21:51
Maybe one of your memory modules suffers from a cold soldering spot on one of the memory chips. Those surface mounted devices could possibly not be aligned correctly before the initial soldering process and thus have inferior contact to the pcb. When the pcb or the leads of the memory chip get warm they stretch a little and therefor come in contact again. you could verify that using technical cold spray and a hair dryer at low heat. Don't burn the memory! First you have to cool down the memory with the cold spray. (DON'T USE IT TOO LONG, THERE MUST NOT BE ICE OR CONDENSING HUMIDITY ON THE CHIPS!!!). If the memory fails now, gently swing the hair dryer's warm air stream over the memory stick (it has to be in the socket though) Don't take the memory out. If the problem is gone you are most likely to have a cold spot. Contact surfaces of the module should be clean before all testing.

Technoid
16th December 1999, 11:54
I have a 128 and a 64 chip in the 'puter and i replased the 128 (and after that my system is rockstable, if it reaches win98)and i havent "Coold" booted to check if i still gets the "Memmory Failed"!

The funny thing is that that 128 and another 128 that we had given upp on (after testing them in 3 different 'puters)are working perfektly in my boss computer at the computer shop vere i work!
I changed the mainboard in that computer to an Aopen AX63Pro yesterday and it havent had any problems with those two crazy 128 ram chips!

------------------
INTEL PIII450 MSI 6163
G200Mill 16MB SDRAM + RRG
SBlive
128 MB RAM
19GB HDD Space!

Thundrchez
16th December 1999, 17:01
Re "...And I always thought computers loved to chill out".

That is not true in all circumstances. For the most part, CMOS chips can do better with cooler temperatures.

However, BiCMOS chips like to be warm, but not hot, for optimal performance. When BiCMOS is chilled past this point, the performance slows down.

There are a million other variables, but it is definitely not a blanket statement that the cooler the better.

Technoid
26th December 1999, 13:57
The problem is solved!


------------------
INTEL PIII450 MSI 6163
G200Mill 16MB SDRAM + RRG
SBlive
128 MB RAM
19GB HDD Space!