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Fat Tone
30th January 2008, 14:18
I’d like you tell me what images come to mind when you ask yourself the question:

What’s the smallest thing that would make the biggest difference?

If you are not feeling creative please ask family & friends, the more thoughts the merrier!

You could post your thoughts or even link an image if you find/create something.

Thanks :up:

T.

Dr Mordrid
30th January 2008, 14:29
A change from light bulbs to LED lighting. Gigawatts of savings.

cjolley
30th January 2008, 14:31
A lithium atom for someone with manic depression (whatever it's called now)

Kruzin
30th January 2008, 14:35
What’s the smallest thing that would make the biggest difference?


A sperm

Gurm
30th January 2008, 14:43
An inch. One stinkin' inch. Of girth.

Rakido
30th January 2008, 14:44
A sperm

+1

Elie
30th January 2008, 14:47
Nanites, could be used to concure major deceases. Project under developement.

cjolley
30th January 2008, 14:53
The fine structure constant

ZokesPro
30th January 2008, 15:09
health

cjolley
30th January 2008, 15:11
A child

Gurm
30th January 2008, 15:18
A child


Indeed, we could throw the child at things. In creative ways!

ND66
30th January 2008, 15:24
The little red button at the nuclear missile launch facility….


.

Admiral
30th January 2008, 15:34
Thinking common sense, don't ask me what or how many images come to mind. :D

Jammrock
30th January 2008, 16:05
magnetic fields...whatever those consist of.

Greebe
30th January 2008, 16:46
The little red button at the nuclear missile lunch facility….


.

Cafeteria food sux :D

ND66
30th January 2008, 17:03
Cafeteria food sux :D




Hey, did anyone see my "a" anywhere?! :eek:


Sorry, typo.... :D




.

KRSESQ
30th January 2008, 17:06
In my particular case, an infant granddaughter.

Kevin

J1NG
30th January 2008, 20:42
A thought. What's required for a thought. To ask others whether they need assistance, and to render it.

J1NG

TransformX
31st January 2008, 02:13
A smile?

Fat Tone
31st January 2008, 03:06
Some of these are great. Thanks Guys :up:

Mehen
31st January 2008, 03:42
Almost every day both of my parents would come home from work having nothing but negative things to say about their day. Complain, complain, complain. I got sick of hearing this so I told them - for every bad thing you say about your day, tell me one good thing - otherwise I don't wanna hear any of it. They don't have to be equally weighted, but as long as its roughly 1:1. (ie. Boss gave me sh*t. I had a really tasty cookie!)

So far its worked pretty good, and the negative mood they come home with is either lessened, or it at least doesn't spread over to me as much :)

edit: and now when I say "I don't wanna hear it," I'm not just being a dick, I'm helping them obeying the "rule" :p

Brian Ellis
31st January 2008, 05:09
6.626176x10^-34 J/Hz (Planck's constant)

Fat Tone
31st January 2008, 06:14
Some great ideas. Not to stifle your imaginations, but what if we think about what's the smallest thing we can do/change that makes the biggest difference?

Umfriend
31st January 2008, 06:18
I'm having a conceptual problem with this question. What is it we're supposed to optimise: input or output or output over input? And difference to whom? I kan kill myself. It is really really a small thing in the grand scheme of things but to me, well, it makes the biggest difference possible.

Fat Tone
31st January 2008, 06:25
I guess we are looking for small inputs making large positive changes. Not sure I'd call killing yourself a positive change (but I hardly know you ;) ). And really we're looking for the image that comes to mind to represent that concept, which isn't neccessarily an example of it.

Brian Ellis
31st January 2008, 06:42
Well, I can't change Planck's constant, can I?

Umfriend
31st January 2008, 08:31
Then I am with J1NG.

Inspiration

Elie
31st January 2008, 09:53
make peace not war

az
31st January 2008, 10:03
Being nice.

Gurm
31st January 2008, 10:17
Some great ideas. Not to stifle your imaginations, but what if we think about what's the smallest thing we can do/change that makes the biggest difference?


Still an inch. Of girth.

Fat Tone
31st January 2008, 11:14
Still an inch. Of girth.

Or you could ask her to get an extra stitch ;)

ZokesPro
31st January 2008, 12:32
What’s the smallest thing that would make the biggest difference?Tolerance.

Gurm
31st January 2008, 14:35
Or you could ask her to get an extra stitch ;)


There's actually a procedure now...

http://www.drmatlock.com/

Lizzard[MPE]
31st January 2008, 15:45
Seeds

and the knowledge to understand how to have personal family gardens. I know it seems silly but if everyone with a backyard grew their own vegetables it would make life better.

Mehen
31st January 2008, 19:43
Tolerance.

ditto

Helevitia
31st January 2008, 20:33
One word... Hope

or one sentence...You are not alone

Helevitia
31st January 2008, 20:36
Wife said, "attitude"
son said, "smile"

Umfriend
1st February 2008, 05:24
;646074']Seeds

and the knowledge to understand how to have personal family gardens. I know it seems silly but if everyone with a backyard grew their own vegetables it would make life better.
It does seem silly and I disagree.

Don't get me wrong, my mother in law grows her own veggies and it is great to have really fresh food when I'm with her. I hope I'll do it myself someday as well. However, productivity otherwise is low and the world will be a worse place if we all spent time inefficiently on food production.

Lizzard[MPE]
1st February 2008, 13:32
I find it funny that you've went through 3 pages of ideas and only disagreed with mine.

So you think if every person in the world had a place and knowledge to grow their own food it would make the world worse.

Personally I would think it would lead to healthier lives. Not to mention cutting down the World Hunger Situation.


But lets see the question was:


"What’s the smallest thing that would make the biggest difference?"

lets say i was wrong and we didn't have seeds at all.. where would we be.

Mikko
1st February 2008, 14:08
Give a hug to someone you care for. It'll make the difference.. ;)

Gurm
1st February 2008, 14:21
Give a hug to someone you care for. It'll make the difference.. ;)


If you care for them, haven't you already hugged them? Maybe you should give a hug to someone you DON'T care for.

Err... on second thought, that's a bad idea. Lawsuit waiting to happen. :(

Mikko
1st February 2008, 14:42
If you care for them, haven't you already hugged them? Maybe you should give a hug to someone you DON'T care for.

Err... on second thought, that's a bad idea. Lawsuit waiting to happen. :(

Just hug someone.. :p

Gurm
1st February 2008, 18:51
Just hug someone.. :p


Oh, you're one of THOSE... those ... those SERIAL HUGGERS!

EVERYBODY SCATTER!

Umfriend
2nd February 2008, 07:18
;646173']I find it funny that you've went through 3 pages of ideas and only disagreed with mine.I hope you did not take me as picking on you. One thing that sets your answer apart from most (if not all) others is that you had a very concreet one. "Inspiration", "being nice", "tolerance" are all fine and well but it is not directly clear what is meant by these and what the expected consequences are. That is what makes it easier to react to you as opposed to others.

So you think if every person in the world had a place and knowledge to grow their own food it would make the world worse.That is not what you suggested. I agree it would be good if everyone had the knowledge how to provide for food (including hunting, slaughtering, gutting etc.) and had a place to do it (which would, I think, put a strain on availability of arable land though).

You suggested that we'd actually all do that and with that I disagreed. Do you have any idea how much more efficient farming is done these days in large scale operations? It is impossible to get that kind of efficiency if we'd all go into autarky. And to fully grow your food you'd almost have to do that. I've spoken with a few farmers who took over the farm from thier fathers, and they from theirs etc. They produce more know with just two hired employees than they did pre-WWII with fourty... It is impossible (or at the least an enormous waste) to provide each individual with the capital investments to obtain such yields.


Personally I would think it would lead to healthier lives. Not to mention cutting down the World Hunger Situation.Again, I am strongly in favour of honest and broad education on food production, diet etc.



But lets see the question was:


"What’s the smallest thing that would make the biggest difference?"

lets say i was wrong and we didn't have seeds at all.. where would we be.
Yeah well, I admit, without seeds we'd have a problem. Course, water almost has a similar aspect to it.

Brian Ellis
2nd February 2008, 07:45
;646074'] I know it seems silly but if everyone with a backyard grew their own vegetables it would make life better.

I emphasise part of what Liz said. She didn't say that everyone should have a backyard. I agree with her, at least partially. We grow fruit and veggies in ours. I don't say that it is cheaper than buying mass-produced farmed produce: it isn't. But the quality is not comparable. If I pick an orange or a peach (in due season, of course), we almost drown in the flavoursome juice. If I pick a tomato or cucumber, it will taste like what a tomato or a cucumber should taste like, not like a waterlogged splooch. And it leaves more of the less good, low cost, fruit and veggie available for those who don't have the luck, means or wish to have a backyard.

Umfriend
2nd February 2008, 08:49
Yes, it was restricted to those who have a backyard but was also expanded to every person when my position was presented (incorrectly). Anyway. Brian, do you grow all your food yourself, did you grow food when you ran your business and how much time does it take you?

Brian Ellis
2nd February 2008, 09:15
I have been growing SOME food since 1970. No, I don't grow all our veggies but probably 75%-80% of our fruit (oranges, grapefruit, pomelos, lemons, mandarines, clementines, peaches, apricots, nectarines, figs, grapes); the only ones we consistently buy are local bananas and mangoes, because they won't grow at his altitude. We use two large chest freezers to bridge the gaps (only yesterday I did a job I really HATE, juiced about 60 grapefruit to make ~ 20 l of a very tasty juice that will keep us going for a few months. Will have another similar session in a couple of weeks). I don't grow any cereals nor meat. Time taken? Very variable. A few minutes/day harvesting on average. Perhaps 40 or 50 hours/year for all other tasks.

My food is organic, but not in the sense of the scam sold in shops. I use an absolute minimum of chemicals (compost for the veggie beds and fruit), one treatment/year of fungicide on grapes and deciduous fruit trees, 2 or 3 treatments of insecticides on deciduous trees (I hate finding half a worm in a peach!), 1 on citrus trees (Mediterranean fruit fly is a REAL PEST). No slug/snail bait (have a dog!).

Umfriend
2nd February 2008, 10:03
First, I now see that Liz may have simply meant that more people should grow something. I took her to mean a far more extreme point. If I was mistaken I apologise. Shit happens. I have no problems with people growing food as a hobby for their self gratification. I don;t think it'll make a big difference in the grand scheme of things but it probably will to the experience these people get from their own grown food.

Anyway, Brian, fruit is different from most, if not all, vegetables and grains in the sense that harvesting is almost all to be done after the trees or bushes have been planted. With the sowing, plowing and harvesting of a whole years' consumption of those (and your livestock if you eat meat), a lot more time and capital would be required, would you not agree?

Brian Ellis
2nd February 2008, 10:42
Not entirely. Many veggies produce far more than fruit trees per m² of land. One tree = typically ~25 m² and that land has to be amortised. If it gives, say, 25 kg of fruit, 1 kg/m² is a much lower yield than I get from tomatoes, aubergines, courgettes, potatoes etc. Then consider that a fruit tree may yield nothing for the first 2-3 years after planting (6 years in the case of my apricot). Fruit trees cost a lot more than a packet of seeds in initial capital and cost more in labour and materials, to boot (pruning, spraying, harvesting, irrigation).

Umfriend
2nd February 2008, 11:44
Those are good points. I do not consider "land" the same as "capital" but anyway. I was pointing at investments in irragation systems, ploughing and harvesting machinery etc. Tomatoes, aubergines, courgettes, potatoes etc. al need to be resown each year, no? My main concern is that with little capital investment, growing food becomes a labour intensive industry so that a lot of labour needs to be redirected from capital-insentive high-value-added industries to agriculture. But again, it may well be we're discussing different things. I am talking about a massive movement to consumption of self grown food to a large extent.