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lowlifecat
30th October 2006, 05:55
'Dilbert' creator recovers from rare disorder (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15446515/)


Scott Adams, 49, creator of the comic strip Dilbert, appears to be a rare example of someone who has largely but not totally, recovered from Spasmodic Dysphonia, a mysterious disease in which parts of the brain controlling speech shut down or go haywire.

Gurm
30th October 2006, 10:52
'Dilbert' creator recovers from rare disorder (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15446515/)


Scott Adams, 49, creator of the comic strip Dilbert, appears to be a rare example of someone who has largely but not totally, recovered from Spasmodic Dysphonia, a mysterious disease in which parts of the brain controlling speech shut down or go haywire.

Yeah, isn't that the disease that makes some people spout nonsense when they try to talk?

KRSESQ
30th October 2006, 11:11
You might be thinking of Tourette Syndrome. (http://www.tourettes-disorder.com/)

Kevin

ZokesPro
30th October 2006, 11:44
I think he means coprolalia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coprolalia).

TransformX
30th October 2006, 11:51
I think he meant Aphasia (http://www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/Aphasia_info.htm).

schmosef
30th October 2006, 12:16
There's such an obvious joke here... It's too obvious. I'm not going for it.

KRSESQ
30th October 2006, 14:27
Coprolalia is an occasional but rare characteristic of Tourette syndrome, although it is not required for a diagnosis of Tourette's.

According to the link, Aphasia is typically linked to stroke and limits the victim's ability to communicate by speech in general.

Kevin

Gurm
30th October 2006, 16:41
I was definitely thinking of Aphasia. It is rare but not unheard of for Aphasia to manifest as the result of a mental disorder as opposed to stroke or brain damage.

More commonly there is a class of mental disorders referred to as "Word Salad":

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_salad_(mental_health)

KvHagedorn
30th October 2006, 18:18
My grandfather had a stroke at 65, and lost his speech.. when it came back he could only speak German. (And this was my English, not my German grandfather!) He subsequently perfectly regained his speech, and had no apparent ill effects afterward, physical or mental, and lived to age 93, all his marbles (and curious intelligence) intact.