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View Full Version : So much for home-built computers, at least with Vista...



Jon P. Inghram
12th October 2006, 18:12
The new Vista license says the license can be moved ONE time to another system. And as we all know, after enough HW changes of your current system, the OS will automatically assume it's no longer the original and require reactivation. :rolleyes:

http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=156

Jessterw
12th October 2006, 18:32
You will also not be allowed to use the home editions in a VM, nor will the basic home edition allow transfer of ISOs to the hard disk.

There's also the limitation to networking with a maximum of 5 devices/computers with that very basic of editions.

Dr Mordrid
12th October 2006, 18:46
This is an open invitation for Apple to release an OSX for PC's as an independent product. At the right box price and with their extra license pricing they'd never miss their H/W sales dropoff.

Jammrock
12th October 2006, 21:17
Wow ... let's analyze this shall we? Who is Vista Ultimate designed for? Enthusists, hobbyists, power users, etc. Retail it costs $400 USD. So basically, MS is telling the power users, their target audience for Ultimate edition, that every third time they upgrade their system they have to fork out another $400 for the OS?

Not a very smart move IMO.

az
12th October 2006, 21:42
On the other hand, 5 networked devices doesn't seem like too little for the basic version. Let's wait and see, I'm probably getting a MacBook anyway once Leopard gets close enough for me to get it for free.

Jessterw
12th October 2006, 21:51
It may be enough for some, but it's a self-imposed limitation that is rather pointless and has the potential to be irksome as consumers increase the number of networked devices in their homes (devices would include other PCs I imagine).

MS has truly lost its way on Vista with all this.

Mehen
12th October 2006, 21:55
XP makes you phone microsoft once you've used the same key twice - this is probably no different. I am sure there is a way to get your key reactivated. Otherwise there will always be cracks.

lowlifecat
12th October 2006, 22:04
This is an open invitation for Apple to release an OSX for PC's as an independent product. At the right box price and with their extra license pricing they'd never miss their H/W sales dropoff.
i don't think they'll have to. i think the mountain will go to mohamad.

i predict in about 1 year to two's time Apple will start seeing a significant spike in market share. they already doing adds, intel chips, boot camp.

i think they smartly going after a weakness in m$ ...with a little help from friends like intel :bunny:+:bunny:=:bunny::bunny::bunny::bunny::bunny ::bunny::bunny::bunny:ok lets just it's a big mountain of bunnys

:laugh:

Technoid
14th October 2006, 12:13
XP makes you phone microsoft once you've used the same key twice - this is probably no different. I am sure there is a way to get your key reactivated. Otherwise there will always be cracks.

I have had to phone activate first time ever used OEM keys....

The PIT
14th October 2006, 12:52
At work we've got one copy of Home Edition which we use to repair Student machines as long as they got the sticker on the hardware. Microsoft have always let us activate over the phone once we've explained the situ.

Dr Mordrid
14th October 2006, 14:40
i don't think they'll have to. i think the mountain will go to mohamad.
That eliminates a lot of upgrade sales. Not everyone will buy a new system to get rid of Windoze.

az
14th October 2006, 15:13
If you have to anyway to upgrade to vista? :)

Dr Mordrid
14th October 2006, 15:23
I don't have to x 10 :)

Jessterw
15th October 2006, 17:02
Paul Thurrott has a posted his take on the EULA changes:
http://www.winsupersite.com/showcase/winvista_licensing.asp

While I'm not sure I agree with some of what he says, in terms of the what the XP vs. Vista licenses are allowing, but he does clear up any confusion on what Vista's licensing is and is not allowing in this limited scope.

No mention of the ISO issue for Vista Home Basic, which I'm hoping (not that I will even been touching Vista) that it's simply a mis-interpretation of some legalese or such.

Still, I would find it hard to invest money in a new PC if it were somehow illegal to move that included OS to any subsequent PCs I might acquire (if that OS were no longer being used on any previous PCs). Obviously this isn't something that has been or likely will be enforced beyond maybe having to beg someone on the opposite of the telephone that you're not some kind of criminal.

Wombat
15th October 2006, 18:24
Still, I would find it hard to invest money in a new PC if it were somehow illegal to move that included OS to any subsequent PCs I might acquire (if that OS were no longer being used on any previous PCs). Obviously this isn't something that has been or likely will be enforced beyond maybe having to beg someone on the opposite of the telephone that you're not some kind of criminal.This is already the case with XP OEM licenses (and Win2K I believe, as well).

Jessterw
15th October 2006, 18:29
Yes, which is apparently the point of the changes to the wording in the Vista EULA; making those terms more clear.

It's also clear that MS thinks those restrictions are fair.

Wombat
15th October 2006, 19:12
I'd like to get an interpretation from someone other than Thurrott. A bigger MS fanboy has probably never existed. He even found a way to make it his own fault when his legitimate XP install decided it was pirated.

Jessterw
15th October 2006, 19:41
Yeah, I tend to take anything he says with a grain of salt until I see it confirmed elsewhere, but in this case he seems to be speaking something of the truth. I still question some of the things he went over, however, I'm sure we'll hear more about this once Vista is released (and likely prior).

And yes, the whole situation with him conveniently (for MS' image) learning he was using a pirated copy of Windows was amusing.