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View Full Version : French language VS. Swear words/blasphemy



ZokesPro
2nd December 2005, 07:51
I was reading a local newspaper called 'Métro', which you can get free in the 'Métro' (subway) in Montreal. I turn the page and what do I see in HUGE letters? And ad that goes like this.


FU
CK

SIDA (aids)


On TV, you hear the F word on french channels as if it was just a normal word, wether it's on a kids show or an adult show or on the news. I was even watch YTV in english (which is a channel aimed at a younger audience) and they passed a movie that didn't bleep any of the swear words either. And there's also this popular french talk show called 'Tout le monde en parle' and they don't censor anything on that show, yet it's not a live show. They hardly censor nudity let alone blasphemy. Not to mention all the shows about sex, and 'Bleu Nuit' which shows soft core porn on saturday nights.

I don't get it.

Dr Mordrid
2nd December 2005, 07:55
And this is a suprise? Much of Europe is that way.

Dr. Mordrid

Tjalfe
2nd December 2005, 07:58
yet the country so proud of its freedom of speech does not allow it..

ZokesPro
2nd December 2005, 08:09
And this is a suprise? Much of Europe is that way.

Dr. Mordrid
A bit yeah. Not as far the the softcore porn goes (cause it's always been this way) but for the F word yes, and especially in a news paper.

As far as the french blasphemy is concerned, it was always censored on TV unless you were watching a documentary. I have no idea why it's used so liberally today. Doesn't show a good example of proper language, plus it's so vulgar and there are plenty of other words that can replace it.

Censorship in Quebec is far more loose than every other province in Canada, yet it shouldn't.

VJ
2nd December 2005, 08:21
And this is a suprise? Much of Europe is that way.
Yep. The only stations on which such words are bleeped out are those originating from the US: MTV, ... I must admit that Belgian stations don't tend to broadcast programs where such words are used early on in the day, but that is not by law. If such swear words are used, they are not censored. Most likely, if such words were used too often during the day, there might be complaints from viewers (perhaps causing the TV station to change their policy), but I don't think it just bothers us that much. Same goes for nudity (which is not the same as pron): if there is such a scene, so be it.

On the other hand, we do have limitations on advertising: the number of blocks per hour are limited, their duration is time limited and there are more strict rules that have to be applied for toy-adverts during childeren's programs. These are limitations imposed by law, but don't really fall under censorship.


Jörg

ZokesPro
2nd December 2005, 08:32
I remember at one point last year when they accidentally broadcasted HARDCORE PRON all day on the Country Music Television channel. :p

That was a mistake though.

Umfriend
2nd December 2005, 08:49
In Europe we need not censor as europeans don't use swear words that much (mainly continental though).

Brian Ellis
2nd December 2005, 09:11
The French have a different attitude to language than Anglo-Saxons. E.g., "Je m'en fous" literally means I'm f**ked of it, figuratively, I couldn't care less, is acceptable under nearly all circumstances, except the politest drawing rooms. Similarly, "foutez-moi la paix" (f**k me the peace, leave me alone) is actually in the polite form of the verb (2nd person plural).

The English TV language, even on BBC, can be quite corsé, but with an oral warning before the programme starts.

Technoid
2nd December 2005, 10:14
Some discovery shows I watch is censored with beeps and it's *bleep* anoying because I sometimes *bleep* *bleep* *bleep* a word they are saying and you wonder how *bleep* the cencors *bleep* out words that just happens to get caught in the last *bleep* :rolleyes:

ZokesPro
2nd December 2005, 11:26
The French have a different attitude to language than Anglo-Saxons. E.g., "Je m'en fous" literally means I'm f**ked of it, figuratively, I couldn't care less, is acceptable under nearly all circumstances, except the politest drawing rooms. Similarly, "foutez-moi la paix" (f**k me the peace, leave me alone) is actually in the polite form of the verb (2nd person plural).

The English TV language, even on BBC, can be quite corsé, but with an oral warning before the programme starts.
In Quebec, the word f*ck is now a common word that means 'screwed' or 'screwed up' and it's used by everyone everywhere, wether it's on a anormal tv show or in the news. :rolleyes:

Nowhere
3rd December 2005, 03:47
Probably in many places people simply don't realise fully the meaning... In similar ways, "black music" songs in English with absolutelly pathetic texts are popular.

Oh, and of course to some extent it's OK...just in case of f*ck IMHO...