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View Full Version : REALbasic 5.5 FREE but only until 4/15/05



ayoub_ibrahim
12th April 2005, 02:57
Because Microsoft has ended support for Visual Basic 6, REAL Software is offering Visual Basic users a new home-REALbasic. From now through April 15, 2005, Visual Basic users can get REALbasic 5.5 for Windows Standard Edition, completely free of charge.

http://www.realsoftware.com/realbasic/vb6/index.php?id=KGLMGTQV

Marshmallowman
12th April 2005, 03:45
why not, downloading now...and I don't even like VB ;)

Jessterw
12th April 2005, 06:32
Not a bad deal really, given that REALbasic was always better in some ways than VB. Nevermind the cross-platform portability it offers.


Edit: Guess I should note that only the Pro version lets you compile for other platforms other than the one being used for development, but it's nice to have to option later on if you upgrade.

cjolley
12th April 2005, 06:44
They would take off like a rocket ship if they had a Linux IDE instead of just Linux as a target.
Not that I mean "just" quite the way that sounded.
Pretty cool deal anyway, I'll DL it at home.

cjolley
12th April 2005, 10:42
...
Edit: Guess I should note that only the Pro version lets you compile for other platforms other than the one being used for development, but it's nice to have to option later on if you upgrade.

That is a marketing mistake on their part as far a Linux is conserned.
Linux people aren't known for their fondness for high dollar licenses.
Though, I gather the 2005 version will come with a Linux IDE version.
And the upgrade comes with the 5.5 license.

Jessterw
12th April 2005, 16:13
In defense of REAL Software, their target market has always been Mac and (later on) Windows developers. Adding support for Linux is really just a means of allowing those aforementioned developers to expand their own market.

I doubt they will lose any sleep over (some) Linux users being anal about paying for software.

xortam
13th April 2005, 14:36
This offer stated "Offer good for Visual Basic users only". Is there any problem downloading this without a VB license? I doubt it but thought I'd double check before going through the bother.

Jessterw
13th April 2005, 15:26
No problem at all.

xortam
13th April 2005, 16:00
Grassy Ass!

J1NG
13th April 2005, 16:20
Would be nice if I actually got the email with the key. I've used two email addresses over two hours ago. Nothing on either one.

:: Edit ::

Look what turned up just now... :rolleyes: :up:

J1NG

cjolley
14th April 2005, 07:37
In defense of REAL Software, their target market has always been Mac and (later on) Windows developers. Adding support for Linux is really just a means of allowing those aforementioned developers to expand their own market.

I doubt they will lose any sleep over (some) Linux users being anal about paying for software.

Not really knocking them, RAD tools for Linux just sounds like it would be a good market to me.

xortam
14th April 2005, 09:25
How solid is the Windows port of this product? I've downloaded the package but haven't installed it yet.

I've actually never touched Visual Basic. I've done a fair amount of Basic programming in the past, though its probably been over twenty years since I last used it.

Jessterw
14th April 2005, 09:33
It's just as solid as the Mac version. REALbasic lacks some of the features found in Visual Studio (Visual Basic notNET), but is well-rounded.

xortam
14th April 2005, 09:39
Is VB still the main scripting language under Windows?

Speaking of VisualStudio ... I wonder if I've got an old copy of that lying around here somewhere. I want to get back to programming again some day ... after I get done with my endless list of projects.

Jessterw
14th April 2005, 09:41
Oh I don't disagree, but given how fickle (F)OSS developers tend to be at times, I doubt the market is very good for a company that wants to actually make money selling licensed, closed-source software.

xortam
14th April 2005, 09:45
... but given how fickle (F)OSS developers tend to be at times, ...Let me guess ... "(F)OSS" is the current TLA for FreeWare Open Source Software?

Jessterw
14th April 2005, 12:18
Let me guess ... "(F)OSS" is the current TLA for FreeWare Open Source Software?
Pretty much. Some people like to muddle the two, but FOSS supporters are zealots more often than not - and when I say supporters, I mean those who believe in no other form of software distribution. Example: Linux is OSS, GNU/Linux is FOSS.

Jessterw
14th April 2005, 12:26
VBScript and VBA (VB for Applications) are still widely used in Windows and Office, so yes, the two in their various functions could be considered the main scripting languages under Windows.

xortam
14th April 2005, 12:33
I attended a lab at Microsoft about seven years ago and I was amazed that they used Basic to sample their ActiveDirectory functions ... Basic for Enterprise apps. :rolleyes:

schmosef
14th April 2005, 14:43
I attended a lab at Microsoft about seven years ago and I was amazed that they used Basic to sample their ActiveDirectory functions ... Basic for Enterprise apps. :rolleyes::rolleyes:


Let's not start an MS bashing session.

Seven years is a long time in computer terms.

Jessterw
14th April 2005, 14:57
Right tool for the job.

And in a MS-centric network, VB is the right tool for RAD... at least it was before MS decided to kill it.

xortam
14th April 2005, 15:05
... Seven years is a long time in computer terms.What is your point in context of my statement?

xortam
14th April 2005, 15:12
... in a MS-centric network, VB is the right tool for RAD ...I suppose they were mostly demonstrating quick RAD administrative apps rather than full blown Enterprise apps. You seem to reinforce the attitude of Microsoft supporters ... “Microsoft is the Enterprise.” I have a somewhat more broader view on what comprises an Enterprise.

schmosef
14th April 2005, 16:14
What is your point in context of my statement?

Well, what were the viable RAD alternatives seven years ago? And where are they now?

xortam
14th April 2005, 16:37
Well, what were the viable RAD alternatives seven years ago? And where are they now?I was talking about Enterprise apps.
Basic for Enterprise apps. :rolleyes: What's all this with RAD?

Jessterw
14th April 2005, 16:46
You seem to reinforce the attitude of Microsoft supporters ... “Microsoft is the Enterprise.” I have a somewhat more broader view on what comprises an Enterprise.
I managed a network of Unix, Windows, and Mac systems, so my view has been rather broad ;)

Hence the reason I used the term MS-centric, as that type of network would likely be the target of Enterprise-level VB apps.

Jessterw
14th April 2005, 16:51
What's all this with RAD?
Rapid Application Development. Comes in handy when you don't have the time to mess with other languages (that don't foster RAD) that double or more the development time of a solution.

For network admins, especially in a MS-centric (there's the term again) network, VB comes in handy as a RAD tool. Follows the same reasoning as Unix admins do for using PERL and such.

xortam
14th April 2005, 16:54
I know what RAD is. My point is I was talking about Enterprise apps ... and not simply Microsoft networks.

Jessterw
14th April 2005, 17:35
Yes well, you were talking about a MS lab and their use of VB with Enterprise apps. Where RAD fits in there seems rather obvious to me.

Marshmallowman
14th April 2005, 18:19
RAD then you want Delphi/Kylix for windows/linux :)
Now that is a proper RAD tool

schmosef
14th April 2005, 19:20
As a fair compromise, I'm not going to start bashing Borland.

In truth, I'm not sure how good their tools are these days.

I do remember that some Delphi apps I'd seen in the late 90s were not very well polished.

And I was personally burned by Borland's lackluster transition to 32bit native compilers.

schmosef
14th April 2005, 19:24
I was talking about Enterprise apps.
To be fair, you were talking about MS Enterprise apps. Unless you forgot to mention that they were covering a different platform in that MS Lab. ;)


What's all this with RAD?
That's what, up until very recently, MS was positioning VB for.

.Net and VS.Net 2002+ have managed to break down a lot of barriers to RAD in various languages. With .Net and the visual tools built into Visual Studio, the language you use isn't so important any more.

Jessterw
14th April 2005, 19:25
And that's saying a lot :D

xortam
14th April 2005, 20:06
Yes well, you were talking about a MS lab and their use of VB with Enterprise apps. Where RAD fits in there seems rather obvious to me.I was talking about the Enterprise and ActiveDirectory. An Enterprise of any significant size is typically heterogeneous in nature and wouldn't be comprised of solely Windows platforms. A Directory, of which ActiveDirectory is an example, is used to manage network entities across an Enterprise. I rolled my eyes up at Microsoft AD code examples being implemented in Basic because it's not a suitable language for coding serious heterogeneous Enterprise applications. This week long session of classes and labs took place while Microsoft was finishing up development of W2K and the rhetoric then was that they wanted to provide services to the Enterprise. This specifically meant to them that they wanted to include support of Unix systems into their architecture, but at least that was a start. Microsoft also started working with the IETF at that time to further support Directory Services and other network services throughout the Enterprise.

I did concede that they were probably using the Basic code samples as an example of RAD administrative tools rather than demonstrating Enterprise apps.

Jessterw
14th April 2005, 21:21
We'll just have to agree to disagree that any enterprise of significant size is going to typically be heterogeneous, but you're right that VB is not the first choice language for creating applications that will interact within a heterogeneous network.

I stand by the fact that VB excels at developing powerful applications quickly, and that this will often be the goal of system/network admins who employ the use of Active Directory and, by extension, other MS-centric systems. There may be a few rare cases to the contrary, but if an organization is running AD, chances are that their network is going to be rather MS-centric.

On another note, Visual Basic is not BASIC, so while you've stated you have worked with the latter, you've also stated you've never used the former. At my former employer I wrote a VB-based laboratory information management system that interfaced with AD, Exchange, and a few other services, as well as applications/services that ran on non-MS platforms. The time required to develop the solution using VB was far less than have been required by most any other language. True, it only ran on Windows, and while that wasn't a downside in this case, it admittedly could have been given different circumstances.

Nowhere
15th April 2005, 01:32
PythonCard (http://pythoncard.sourceforge.net/) is fun...

cjolley
15th April 2005, 07:08
Of course there is PowerBuilder (http://www.sybase.com/powerbuilder)
It is a really great RAD tool for DB front ends.
@ $3,000 a seat it's not much for home use though. :D
(for Enterprise, you don't want the other two)