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Drizzt
23rd August 2002, 15:23
1) I never remember when to use "was" and when to use "where". Is there a logical way to choose between the two or the only way is to use memory?

2) Technoid used "seri" term a few posts ago. Is it really an english term? :eek: :eek: :eek:

3) "Author's book" is easy. But what if the author name ends with s letter? :confused:


(it's too much time I don't seriously write English, and I think it's time to remove the rust. Third question is really embarassing :o )

ZokesPro
23rd August 2002, 15:28
#1
"was" is for past tense use.
Ex: I was about to go to the movies.

"where" is for a location or direction.
Ex: Where are we going?


#2
Never heard of the word "seri". Don't think it exists.


#3
In that case you just add '

Like my name is Denis.

Ex: Denis' Book

That one is easy for me! :)

P.S: Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong. My first language is French.

Wombat
23rd August 2002, 15:36
No, that's incorrect. You <B>always</B> add 's if the noun is singular and/or does not end in s, and just ' if it's plural and ends in s. Sorry, I tend to be a bit of a grammar nazi.

Bob's book
Moses's book
the postman's book
The countess's book
the man's book
the men's book
the kid's book (but would be child's book)
the kids' book (but would be children's book)

ZokesPro
23rd August 2002, 15:38
That's fine by me Wombat. :)

Gurm
23rd August 2002, 16:13
I think he meant "was" and "were". In that case...

USUALLY it's another case of singular and plural.

I _was_ ugly, but then I got a facelift.

He _was_ stupid, but then he got a brain transplant.

She _was_ a bitch, but then she got laid (and God did she need it!).

They _were_ in the house, but now they aren't.

The builders _were_ busy building me a bondage room.

- Gurm

ZokesPro
23rd August 2002, 16:14
Nice examples there Gurm! :p

Gurm
23rd August 2002, 16:23
Danke.

Technoid
23rd August 2002, 16:28
Originally posted by Drizzt

2) Technoid used "seri" term a few posts ago. Is it really an english term? :eek: :eek


Originally posted by Technoid
Okay, now I have spell checked!
Could you now please be seri........... :rolleyes: :eek: :D

Why do I even bother?
I should know that the second anyone is serious in the Soapbox, Joel closes the thread :D

I tried to make the impression that I was going to say "serious" but stops halfway when I realise what I wrote after "seri..........." :D

BTW:
Im dyslectic and sometimes my spelling suffers :devious:

ZokesPro
23rd August 2002, 16:35
The mysteries are revealed! :)

SpiralDragon
23rd August 2002, 17:47
Originally posted by Technoid


bTW:
Im dyslectic and sometimes my spelling suffers :devious:


gee i sulfer from the same thing :D

SpiralDragon
23rd August 2002, 17:51
but actualy i dont think of it as suffering .... i think its actualy kewl if it whernt for the darnd spelling and all those words and letters jumping back and forth or magicly disapearning befor my eyes every time i try to read...... but hay .. dyslexics are known HIGH acheevers :d right Technoid ;)

UtwigMU
23rd August 2002, 18:06
Originally posted by Gurm
The builders _were_ busy building me a bondage room.
- Gurm

Actually some floor plans for rich people's homes did contain sexuarium

Dr Mordrid
23rd August 2002, 18:36
Sexuarium? Isn't that a synonym for the master bedroom?

Or would that be where the swings, sex chairs, plastic & leather toys would be stored? :) :)

Dr. Mordrid

KvHagedorn
23rd August 2002, 19:03
Maybe there are six aquariums in the room... :D

I think it's just called a dungeon. ;)

I know in ancient Rome the rich had a room called the vomitorium, where they could practice their bulemic social customs.. gorge and purge :D

agallag
23rd August 2002, 19:05
It's where you keep the Nirvana-12... seats 6, 12hp, unisex attachments... perhaps I share too much :D

Technoid
24th August 2002, 04:40
This thread has evolved beoyond it's humble beginnings! :devious:

KvHagedorn
24th August 2002, 05:45
Originally posted by Technoid
This thread has evolved beoyond it's humble beginnings! :devious:

It's all Jason's fault (as usual) :p

Gurm
24th August 2002, 05:48
Don't blame me. I just gave some examples of fine English sentence construction.

- Gurm

Technoid
24th August 2002, 05:50
What about some examples of bad English sentence destrucion :devious: :D

VJ
24th August 2002, 05:53
On the "was" and "were" issue, isn't it true the "were" can also be used in certain singular conditional forms:

If I were a rich man... (da da di di .... :))


Jörg

rubank
24th August 2002, 06:21
That´s correct, in the context of "If I were a rich man (like you)",
like "If I were you..." (singular or pural).

Then there´s "Bess you is my woman now.." which is not really correct english, but could be perfectly correct in an ethnic context (modified english).

rubank

Guru
24th August 2002, 14:22
Originally posted by Technoid

BTW:
Im dyslectic and sometimes my spelling suffers :devious:


You should get yourself on of these!http://images.cafepress.com/prodtn/2661073_F_tn.jpg

http://www.cafeshops.com/cp/store.aspx?s=dribble3

Technoid
24th August 2002, 14:57
nahh, I have almost trained it away in swedish and nowdays its more that my "fingers" are more dyslectic than my head :D (hitting the wrong damn keys)

UtwigMU
24th August 2002, 17:42
I remember this anecdote:

Two girls sitting by the seaside.
Me and my friend: "Hello, do you speak English?"
- "No."
- "German?"
- "No."
- "French?"
- "No."
- "Swedish?" (The guy spent his childhood in Sweden"
- "No"
- "Then we know where you come from."

Drizzt your english is great for an Italian. So far I met only 1 Italian person that spoke english well.

Gurm
25th August 2002, 14:52
"Ethnic English" is not English. Please don't start with that.

- Gurm

Drizzt
26th August 2002, 04:41
Originally posted by Gurm
I think he meant "was" and "were". In that case...

USUALLY it's another case of singular and plural.

I _was_ ugly, but then I got a facelift.

He _was_ stupid, but then he got a brain transplant.

She _was_ a bitch, but then she got laid (and God did she need it!).

They _were_ in the house, but now they aren't.

The builders _were_ busy building me a bondage room.

- Gurm


I still have problems...
What about "you" and "we" ? O_o

Lizzard[MPE]
26th August 2002, 04:45
drizzt... may i send you my Websters New world Pocket Dictionary?

Agent31
26th August 2002, 04:48
ignore my post, I'm just following Lizzie around to piss her off :D

Drizzt
26th August 2002, 04:49
Originally posted by UtwigMU
I remember this anecdote:

Two girls sitting by the seaside.
Me and my friend: "Hello, do you speak English?"
- "No."
- "German?"
- "No."
- "French?"
- "No."
- "Swedish?" (The guy spent his childhood in Sweden"
- "No"
- "Then we know where you come from."


ROTFL!! :D
Damn, always trying to **** our women :mad: ;)





Drizzt your english is great for an Italian. So far I met only 1 Italian person that spoke english well.

Thanks! :)
However, I'm simply writing. I think I can't even pronounce one single english world without having to districate my tongue after :D

It's been years since the last time I spoke English :(

Drizzt
26th August 2002, 04:54
Originally posted by Lizzard[MPE]
drizzt... may i send you my Websters New world Pocket Dictionary?

Wouldn't you like to make a little trip to Italy and carry it personally? :bandit: ;)

Gurm
26th August 2002, 16:46
Drizzt,

To continue...

We is the personal plural. The plural form of "I". Hence, as a plural, you use "were".

We _were_ old, but then we drank from the fountain of youth.

You, whether singular OR plural, is always treated as plural.

For example...

"Drizzt, I think that you WERE an alcoholic. In fact, you still ARE!"

Or...

You damn heathen Europeans WERE oppressing us here in the "colonies", but now you ARE a second-rate world power.

- Gurm

Drizzt
27th August 2002, 07:42
10x, more clear now.

Drizzt
27th August 2002, 07:48
Ok, next question (I'll try to keep them all in this thread)
You typed:
"Can you blame them? They're having an AMAZING amount of tourism generated off this movie. "

My brain tell me that I'd have used "generated by this movie. ", so:
What's the difference between off and by in this case? When use one and when the other?

Gurm
27th August 2002, 07:54
Off is colloquial and not particularly good English in this case.

"I'm living OFF the proceeds of the sale."

That's a colloquial way to say "I am surviving BY MEANS OF the proceeds of the sale."

English does this a lot. However, in the example YOU cited, BY or FROM would in fact be better. Off is overused.

- Gurm

dave m
27th August 2002, 07:59
Yes, I'd have said from the movie, rather than off. The distinction is in how direct the association of the generation of tourism is to the movie. If you say "from (or off) the movie" you're saying that the tourism has been generated indirectly, presumably as a result of people seeing the movie. To say "by the movie" says that the movie has directly generated tourism by itself.
HTH (and is correct)

Dave

Edit, Gurm beat me to it :)

az
27th August 2002, 08:34
HTH?

Oh, BTW, I feel I'm using too many commas (in german, "kommata" would be the more correct plural, would it be "commata" in english?). For example, does "too" need a leading comma, if used at the end of a sentence, like in "I have problems with the english language, too"?

AZ

dave m
27th August 2002, 08:53
Az, HTH: Hope This Helps

Dave

az
27th August 2002, 09:33
Ah, thanks :)

AZ

Gurm
27th August 2002, 09:46
Az,

Yes, that comma is appropriate.

My general rule (and this is VERY broad) is that if you would pause when speaking the sentence out loud, a comma is appropriate. There are other specific rules.

Some examples of wrong/right usage:

WRONG: "Although, many people have bought Bonzi Buddy it still remains a crappy product."

RIGHT: "Although many people have bought Bonzi Buddy, it still remains a crappy product."

WRONG: "I think, that you should see a psychiatrist for that emotional problem in case it gets out of hand again."

RIGHT: "I think you should see a psychiatrist for that emotional problem, in case it gets out of hand again."

- Gurm

az
27th August 2002, 10:06
Thank you :)

I never knew the german rules for commas, always used my feeling - and it has almost never lead me wrong.

I use the same tactic for english - be it spelling or grammar - and I think it works quite well :)

AZ

GNEP
27th August 2002, 10:24
Spot on there Gurm. Now another little oddity - often in print you see some words italicised for emphasis. Is it me, or do they quite often get the wrong word in italics?

I can't think of specific examples off the top of my head, but it always seem that the people writing/printing these sentences get the word immediately after or before the one that I would have put in italics. (A bit like that really :D)

Drizzt
27th August 2002, 12:56
Just a side note: no one Italian would ever dream to write its text all tilted... :)

Gurm
27th August 2002, 14:48
Oh c'mon. Italians never used italics? Please. I've read the scores to opera.

- Gurm