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Greebe
23rd April 2000, 23:13
Space Weather News for April 24, 2000

An interplanetary shock wave passed by NASA's ACE spacecraft at 0400 UT
(midnight EDT) on April 24. The solar wind velocity jumped from 420 to 520
km/s and the interplanetary magnetic field turned southward. These
conditions are likely to create geomagnetic disturbances on Earth and
possible displays of aurora borealis at middle latitudes. Sky watchers are
advised to be on the lookout for Northern Lights near local midnight.

That means Monday guys'n gals!

For more information, please visit http://www.spaceweather.com


[This message has been edited by Greebe (edited 24 April 2000).]

ALBPM
24th April 2000, 06:39
Oh!!No!!

Not another one of those "Mass Emissions Flashback" thingies.

I just hate that when everyone up North is having "Flashbacks" and seeing all those colored lights and we don't see that way down here. Don't you hate that??? I just hate that...LOL

Paul

Mike was just waiting for me to trash his thread...Don't you just hate that....LOL

The PIT
24th April 2000, 11:27
Well bugger it it's cloudy again!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Jorden
24th April 2000, 11:37
It's clear here, just hope to see a lightshow like last month http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/smile.gif

Pauly: just watch the video... someone will put it on the internet http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/wink.gif

Jord.

Hunsow
24th April 2000, 12:35
It's getting darker but so far I can only see some stars and some bats.

The PIT
24th April 2000, 12:42
Hunsow perhaps you could use your Webcam?

Hunsow
24th April 2000, 12:50
Good idea, if something is showing I will try and make a picture, maybe even live pictures.

cancer
25th April 2000, 20:44
a quick question guys, is the aurora borealis(northern lights) a mirror image of the australis borealis(southern Lights). i remember seeing it on some doco(pretty cool doco too).
cheers.

------------------
Aopen HX08 full tower case, Asus P3V4X bios 1.03, P!!! FC-PGA 550e @733, 160M pc100 sdram, Matrox G400MAX bios 1.4 PDesk 5.52.015, Seagate 28.5G Ultra ATA66 7200rpm HD, Pioneer 103s DVD 6X/32X drive, SB AWE64 Gold ISA sound card, SMC pci ethernet adaptor, Castlewood Orb 2.2G media drive, Nortel 100 cable modem, Mitsubishi 1995 19in monitor, occasionally use dualhead for dvd on a Sony 80cm Wega TV, MS natural keyboard, MS Intellimouse Explorer,
Win98SE 4.10.2222A, DX7a.

The PIT
27th April 2000, 00:59
Cancer Yup the same thing.

cancer
27th April 2000, 01:23
Thanks Pit & this is very weird phenomenon but interesting none the less.
Cheers.


------------------
Aopen HX08 full tower case, Asus P3V4X bios 1.03, P!!! FC-PGA 550e @733, 160M pc100 sdram, Matrox G400MAX bios 1.4 PDesk 5.52.015, Seagate 28.5G Ultra ATA66 7200rpm HD, Pioneer 103s DVD 6X/32X drive, SB AWE64 Gold ISA sound card, SMC pci ethernet adaptor, Castlewood Orb 2.2G media drive, Nortel 100 cable modem, Mitsubishi 1995 19in monitor, occasionally use dualhead for dvd on a Sony 80cm Wega TV, MS natural keyboard, MS Intellimouse Explorer,
Win98SE 4.10.2222A, DX7a.

Rowan
27th April 2000, 02:40
Living in southern Finland I saw my first aurora borealis last winter. It was just awesome. The whole sky was colored with green and yellow 'waves' with red here and there. It cannot be captured on film. Now I really understand those Japanese tourists that come to Lapland from the other side of the globe to watch the sky. They even have one guide whose only duty is to watch the sky at nights and wake everyone up.

I was in the army at the time. They were so spectacular I actually didn't mind leaving the warmth of the tent and my rugsack. I'll remember that night for the rest of my life, standing there on snow covered rocky plain, brisk wind blowing, orienteering by the lights on sky.

(Just to make all you feel a bit more bad for not seeing Aurora Borealis http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/wink.gif

Paddy
28th April 2000, 09:01
why cant it be captured on film?

SteveC
28th April 2000, 09:30
I assume he means the 'atmosphere' cannot be captured on film.

------------------
Cheers,
Steve

"Life is what we make of it, yet most of us just fake"

Jord
28th April 2000, 12:29
I hope so Steve, as I found the following four pics of Aurora Borealis and Aurora Australis:

http://amstel.wins.uva.nl/~cmulder/anw/pres/pmoll/northlgt.gif

I sure hope those are pictures http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/smile.gif

Jord.

[This message has been edited by Jord (edited 28 April 2000).]

Greebe
1st May 2000, 09:11
Space Weather News for May 1, 2000

A coronal mass ejection (CME) from a small sunspot group was recorded
by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory on April 30, 2000. If
material from the eruption is heading toward Earth, as animations
of the CME suggest, then the shock wave will probably arrive
late on May 2nd or sometime on May 3rd. Forecasters estimate a
30% chance of active geomagnetic conditions at middle-latitudes
on May 3, 2000.

For more information, please visit http://www.spaceweather.com

DentyCracker
1st May 2000, 11:49
Yeah those coronal mass ejections can be lots of fun ooohhhh yeaahhh!!!

Jord
1st May 2000, 12:26
A mass ejection was recorded, as animations suggest, the shock wave will probably arrive late. Forecasters estimate a 30% chance of active magnetic conditions at middle-latitudes

How's sex like that, huh? http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/icons/icon10.gif

Jord.

Brian R.
2nd May 2000, 08:29
Sounds like sex with a statistician.

SCompRacer
16th May 2000, 06:46
After the 24th, we had a few of our experimental "keyless entry" Fed Ex trucks with intermittent no starts. These have a transponder, which is worn upon the wrist, that are read by a signal sending reader at each door. All doors have magnetic switches and must be closed for the ignition reader to start the vehicle.

Capitalizing on Greebe's announcement along with the media attention, I wrote an e mail to my manager pointing out this geomagnetic disturbance and the possible cause of the no starts.

The explanation sounded believable until I asked to be appointed to a team to study this phenomenon before these were put into production. I figured someone in the Ivory Towers in Memphis would buy it, but alas my boss would have none of it and wanted the real explanation.

Mis-aligned and weak magnets on the door closed sensors was all I found, but that sounds too boring.

-------------------------------------------

Maybe I can approach from a different angle, like effects of heat and humidity on magnetic fields. Any help out there?



[This message has been edited by SCompRacer (edited 16 May 2000).]

Greebe
16th May 2000, 17:28
Space Weather News for May 16, 2000

On May 15 a coronagraph on the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory
captured rare images of a full halo coronal mass ejection with 4 planets
and the Pleiades in the field of view. Material from the eruption could
arrive in the neighborhood of Earth on May 17 or 18.

For more information and animations, visit http://www.spaceweather.com

Greebe
18th May 2000, 08:05
Actually guys it can be on film (as Jord's pics prove). The difficulty lies with the low illuminosity of this phenomenom. If a very fast lens and "hypered" film is used, it's easily captured.
Hypered film is used in Astrophotography and can be made at home (with a couple hundred $$ invested) or ordered. Any high end/professional photography store can point you in the right direction. Another means is to pick up a copy of Astronomy or Sky & Telescope mag. and look through the suppliers in the back.

P.S. this also takes special development processing so the Photomart around the corner won't work.

Greebe
7th June 2000, 19:24
Space Weather News for June 6, 2000

An intense "X-class" solar flare today was followed by a full-halo coronal mass ejection. Material from the leading edge of the disturbance is expected to arrive on Thursday, June 8, with possible auroral displays to follow.

AND>

Space Weather News for June 7, 2000

Following close on the heels of yesterday's two X-class solar flares, a third powerful X-class flare erupted today at approximately 1545 UT. Soon afterward, coronagraphs on the orbiting Solar and Heliospheric Observatory detected a faint full halo coronal mass ejection. It appears to be heading in the direction of Earth at ~800 km/s. This latest full halo CME will probably extend the geomagnetic disturbances expected to begin on Thursday when an interplanetary shock wave spawned by a CME on June 6 collides with
our planet's magnetosphere. Aurora watchers are advised to be on the alert for Northern Lights beginning after sunset on Thursday, June 8.

For more information, please visit http://www.spaceweather.com

I'll be on a plane at 35,000ft thurssday night, and hope all us LAN Party goers will have a great display this weekend. http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/wink.gif

Greebe
8th June 2000, 09:45
Space Weather News for June 8, 2000

A vigorous shock wave passed NASA's ACE solar wind monitoring spacecraft this morning at 0842 UT. Disturbances detected by ACE usually reach Earth about an hour later. This disturbance was the leading edge of a gigantic bubble of gas ejected from the Sun on June 6. It's been expanding toward our planet for the past day and a half. For more information and updates please visit http://www.spaceweather.com


Sounds like the Burrito I ate last night, Oy! http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/wink.gif

Jorden
8th June 2000, 09:58
800km/sec = 2,880,000km/hour... what is a thing to compare that speed with? How fast will the Enterprise go? http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/wink.gif

Btw, what does a gas bubble from the sun smell like?

Jord.

[This message has been edited by Jorden (edited 08 June 2000).]

2K
8th June 2000, 16:39
"How fast will the Enterprise go?"

Warp 9.8 or 9.9 ?

The PIT
9th June 2000, 06:43
Well bugger it it's cloudy again.

Greebe
13th July 2000, 20:50
Space Weather News for July 13, 2000

Stargazers in both hemispheres are advised to watch for auroras tonight as the result of a strong solar wind disturbance that struck Earth's magnetosphere at approximately 0940 UT (5:40 a.m. EDT) on July 13th. The strong geomagnetic storm that started this morning may now be subsiding, but another interplanetary shock wave is expected to arrive on July 14th and extend the current period of geomagnetic unrest. Auroral displays at middle latitudes are possible (but by no means guaranteed) around local
midnight on July 13th through 15th. For more information please visit Spaceweather (http://www.spaceweather.com)

Photographers who capture pictures of Northern or Southern Lights during the next few days are invited to send their images as attachments to webmaster@spaceweather.com for display on SpaceWeather.com.

The PIT
14th July 2000, 01:05
Guess what? It's going to be cloudy again although I guess I'm going to be to far south anyway.

Greebe
14th July 2000, 12:02
Space Weather News for July 14, 2000

This morning an X5-class solar flare, one of the most powerful flares of the current solar cycle, triggered a proton storm in the neighborhood of our planet. Just after the eruption, coronagraphs on board the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory recorded a full halo coronal mass ejection heading toward Earth at greater than 1000 km/s. Please visit Spaceweather.com (http://www.spaceweather.com) for details and updates on this developing story.

Jord
14th July 2000, 12:02
So this means the Earth is going to die tonight? Another mass coronal ejection and we're dead, right? http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/wink.gif

Jord.

Greebe
14th July 2000, 12:11
I doubt that Jord (or could you imagine the the news of that?!). Hopefully this time around we'll have a spectacular show http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/smile.gif

The PIT
14th July 2000, 13:26
Hey we can have a Barbi Invite a few Aliens from seti

Jorden
14th July 2000, 14:00
Hey Mike, how did you do that? I was answering on the second message about the mass coronal ejection, and now my answer is in front of the subject.... are you a wizard? http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/wink.gif

Jord.

[This message has been edited by Jorden (edited 14 July 2000).]

ALBPM
14th July 2000, 14:38
The Mother Ship is coming to take Jorden back....LOL http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/wink.gif


Paul

andrei
14th July 2000, 15:03
http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/biggrin.gif

Greebe
14th July 2000, 19:58
NASA Science News for July 14, 2000

A powerful solar flare on July 14th triggered an intense radiation storm in the vicinity of Earth.
The eruption was followed by a fast-moving coronal mass ejection that is expected to strike Earth's magnetosphere as early as Saturday. The impact could trigger Northern and Southern Lights bright enough to be seen in spite of this weekend's brilliant full Moon. Such a display is by no means guaranteed, but it is possible.
Observers across the Pacific could be in for a very rare treat: the sight of shimmering colorful aurora during the total lunar eclipse of July 16, 2000.

FULL STORY at
NASA Headlines (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2000/ast14jul_2m.htm?list)

Greebe
9th November 2000, 02:11
Pics from latest Aurora's http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/smile.gif http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/gallery_06nov00.html

Anyone get a peek where they live?

Himself
9th November 2000, 11:38
The only funny lights we get to see in the sky lately are the rare occurances of the sun and the moon. http://forums.murc.ws/ubb/smile.gif

Greebe
26th November 2000, 01:51
Space Weather News for Nov. 26, 2000 http://www.spaceweather.com

The first of several coronal mass ejections now heading toward Earth hit our planet's magnetosphere between 0500 and 0600 UT on Nov. 26th.

Geomagnetic activity could become severe during the next 48 hours as one shock wave after another reaches Earth. We encourage sky watchers to be alert for auroras at middle- and perhaps even low-latitudes. The new Moon will afford dark skies for spotting faint Northern Lights.

The PIT
26th November 2000, 09:55
More rainy nights due then so far it's never failed!!!

SteveC
26th November 2000, 16:31
The sky's always Orange here from light pollution....

------------------
Cheers,
Steve

"Life is what we make of it, yet most of us just fake"

The PIT
27th November 2000, 01:27
Well tell the buggers to turn the light off when they leave.

Greebe
19th December 2000, 19:21
Space Weather News for Dec. 19, 2000 http://www.spaceweather.com

METEORS & AURORA: Sky watchers who venture outside to view the Ursid
meteor shower Thursday night or Friday morning might also spot aurora
borealis. A coronal mass ejection that left the Sun on Monday is likely
to buffet Earth's magnetosphere later this week. Forecasters estimate a
20% chance of severe geomagnetic activity when the CME arrives.

NEAR-EARTH ASTEROIDS: A newly-discovered near-Earth asteroid, 2000 YA,
will pass just two lunar distances from Earth on Dec. 22nd. There's no
danger of a collision, say scientists, but the small space rock will be
near enough to see through large amateur telescopes or through small
telescopes equipped with CCD cameras.

Greebe
25th September 2001, 19:34
Space Weather News for Sept. 25, 2001
http://www.spaceweather.com

AURORA ALERT: An interplanetary shock wave spawned by Monday's powerful
solar explosion swept past our planet at approximately 2100 UT (2:00 p.m.
PDT) on Tuesday, Sept. 25th. The solar wind velocity soared from 400 km/s
to more than 800 km/s in a matter of minutes as the shock wave sped by.
Earth is still inside the resulting high-speed solar stream and auroras
are possible tonight even at low latitudes where such displays rarely
happen. Sky watchers are advised to look for Northern Lights after local
sunset. Local midnight is usually the best time for aurora spotting but if
a powerful geomagnetic storm develops bright auroras might be visible at
any time of the night.

The PIT
26th September 2001, 01:23
Bugger more rain on the way. :rolleyes: :rolleyes: